Trauma

108 – Learning How to Love Yourself

Self-Compassion and the Teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh
TIM DESMOND

What would it feel like to love and accept every part of yourself? In this workshop, we’ll learn a four-step process for cultivating self-compassion with roots in modern science and the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh. We’ll begin with guided meditations to help us get in touch with an embodied experience of compassion and love. Then we’ll learn how to direct that compassion toward ourselves, especially in difficult moments or when we’re feeling insecure. Through self-compassion meditation, we’ll explore how to heal suffering and trauma from the past. And finally, we’ll learn how to recognize beauty in the parts of ourselves that we might view as imperfect or even dysfunctional. Join us to:

  • Learn how to transform the harsh habits of self-criticism through forging a friendlier relationship with the self
  • Explore self-compassion through mindful movement, guided meditation, and group sharing
  • Discover how self-compassion practices can improve your relationships and deepen your work

Tim Desmond, LMFT, is a psychotherapist, student of Thich Nhat Hanh, and cofounder of the Morning Sun Mindfulness Center in New Hampshire. He trains therapists in mindfulness and self-compassion practices and is the author of Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy.

Posted in Mind, Body, and Brain, Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

124 – Transforming Shame and Self-Loathing

A Neurobiological Perspective
JANINA FISHER

Shame and self-loathing are often part of trauma’s aftermath—responses so powerful they can shut off the capacity to absorb positive experience, block the ability to connect with others, and frustrate the best efforts of therapists to build self-esteem. This workshop will present a new perspective for understanding shame and a mind–body approach to treating it. You’ll learn that shame is more than an emotion—it’s a response wired deep in our neurobiology, a survival strategy driving somatic responses of obedience and submission. We’ll explore specific techniques to help clients:

  • Become aware of shame as a powerful body response reinforced by shame-based thoughts
  • Come to understand shame as a “part” of them rather than the whole of their being
  • Use Sensorimotor interventions for shifting shame states physiologically

Janina Fisher, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and instructor at the Trauma Center in Boston, a senior faculty member of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, and a former instructor at Harvard Medical School.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Mind, Body, and Brain, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical: 9:30 A.M. – NOON & 1 P.M. – 4 P.M., Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , ,

125 – The Attachment Dance with Traumatized Clients

One Step Forward and Two Steps Back
LISA FERENTZ

While every therapist understands that treatment is most effective when it unfolds within the context of a safe therapeutic relationship, it’s often challenging to build a meaningful alliance with traumatized clients who turn therapy into an emotional rollercoaster. This is even more challenging when therapists have their own attachment wounds. Through case examples, videos, and discussion, you’ll learn how to:

  • Handle the impact of disorganized attachment and traumatic transference on the client–therapist relationship
  • Recognize how your own attachment experiences can evoke countertransreferential responses that can influence therapy
  • Integrate strategies that can strengthen attunement, address testing behaviors, and increase secure attachment

Lisa Ferentz, LCSW-C, DAPA, a private practitioner, consultant, and educator specializing in trauma, is the founder of the Institute for Advanced Psychotherapy Training and Education and author of Treating Self-Destructive Behaviors in Trauma Survivors: A Clinician’s Guide and Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors: A Workbook of Hope and Healing.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical: 9:30 A.M. – NOON & 1 P.M. – 4 P.M., Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , ,

203/303 – The Healing Power of Self-Compassion

Advanced Clinical Tools and Cutting-Edge Science
TIM DESMOND

From depression and anxiety to addiction and trauma, a lack of self-compassion is at the core of nearly every presenting problem. Luckily, neuroscience has demonstrated that through practice, self-compassion is a skill that can regulate emotions, transform negative core beliefs, and heal trauma. This highly interactive workshop brings together recent discoveries in neurobiology, cognitive science, and psychotherapy outcome research to give you a wealth of information about new developments that have huge implications for therapy, including:

  • Learning how the brain’s compassion center, which neuroscientists call the Care circuit, can be targeted and fortified using specific techniques
  • Self-compassion practices that have been adopted specifically for different kinds of presenting problems, including trauma, depression, and anxiety
  • How you can use self-compassion practices to enhance your relationships with clients and make your work more enjoyable and deeply fulfilling

Continued with workshop 303.

Tim Desmond, LMFT, is a psychotherapist, student of Thich Nhat Hanh, and cofounder of the Morning Sun Mindfulness Center in New Hampshire who trains therapists in mindfulness and self-compassion practices. He is also the author of Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy.

Posted in All Day, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

204/304 – Getting Through to Inner-City Youth

Discovering the Untapped Hero Within
KENNETH HARDY

Look into the troubled lives of many impoverished inner-city youth and you’ll often discover a walled-off history of unacknowledged loss. This workshop will broaden your understanding of how social context can breed traumatic injury and offers a fresh look at the importance of uncovering the buried impact of trauma in the lives of acting-out
youth. We’ll focus on how to:

  • Maintain an effective, empathic therapeutic alliance with kids who
    are nonresponsive, hostile, and even physically threatening
  • Develop a genogram-like Loss Diagram detailing the deaths of loved ones, serial placements in foster homes, and dislocations due to economic or family circumstances
  • Help clients discover and appreciate their positive traits and skills that helped them through tough times, which are the key resources they’ll need to move toward a better future

Continued with workshop 304.
Kenneth Hardy, PhD, is director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relationships
and professor of marriage and family
therapy at Drexel University.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

205/305 – Post-Traumatic Growth

From Devastation to Hope
LISA FERENTZ

Although it’s important for therapists to help clients process the painful and often demoralizing effects of trauma, it’s also crucial to nurture their potential for new possibilities of healing through post-traumatic growth. In fact, learning respectful ways to plant seeds of hope and resilience can make all the difference when working with trauma survivors. In this workshop, we’ll focus on:

  • The tangible markers of post-traumatic growth, such as new ways of relating to others, the rediscovery of personal strengths, and a newfound appreciation for life in general
  • Specific strategies—including writing exercises, role-playing, art, and guided imagery—to help clients connect with the concept of post-traumatic growth and their own journey
  •  How to use somatic resourcing and remembered resources to access clients’ inner wisdom

Continued with workshop 305.

Lisa Ferentz, LCSW-C, DAPA, a private practitioner, consultant, and educator specializing in trauma, is the founder of the Institute for Advanced Psychotherapy Training and Education and author of Treating Self-Destructive Behaviors in Trauma Survivors: A Clinician’s Guide and Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors: A Workbook of Hope and Healing.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , ,

208/308 – Lessons of Loss

A New Approach to Grief Work
ROBERT NEIMEYER

Death doesn’t end a relationship. In this workshop, we’ll explore a new way of doing grief work that helps the bereaved person say goodbye to one aspect of the relationship with a departed loved one while learning to acknowledge a continuing bond and a different kind of ongoing connection. We’ll learn a variety of ways to help clients face the challenge of grief by discovering how to:

  • Identify factors that complicate the experience of grief, such as insecure attachments and invisible/divided loyalties
  • Use meaning-making strategies such as restorative retellings of the death and reviewing the life imprint of the deceased on the client’s own life
  • Introduce imagined dialogues with the loved one to reaffirm love and resolve residual grief

Continued with workshop 308.

Robert Neimeyer, PhD, has published 28 books, including Techniques of Grief Therapy. He’s a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Memphis and maintains an active clinical practice. He served as president of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, and as chair of the International Work Group for Death, Dying, & Bereavement.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , , , ,

210/310 – Working the Edge in Healing Trauma

Can Therapy Sometimes Be Too Safe?
DIANE POOLE HELLER

While most therapists are sensitive to the hazards of retraumatizing clients by pushing them too far, too fast, what about the dangers of playing it too safe? When is too much risk avoidance a disservice to clients and an indication of the therapist’s overprotectiveness getting in the way of growth? In this workshop, we’ll look closely at how to understand clients’ threat threshold and establish an optimal pace in trauma recovery, drawing fully on their resilience and capacity for self-healing. Through video clips and demonstration, we’ll cover how to:

  • Use resourcing and other methods to set up corrective experiences with clients learning how to handle increasing arousal and discomfort
  • Recognize your own tendency to be overprotective and rescue vulnerable clients
  • Invite and empower clients to face manageable challenges and find ways to test their own limits

Continued with workshop 310.

Diane Poole Heller, PhD, is the creator of the Dynamic Attachment Re-Patterning Experience (DARe) Therapist Certification program, Therapy Mastermind Circle, and an established expert in Adult Attachment Theory and Trauma Resolution.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , ,

213/313 – The Challenge of Treating Complex PTSD

What to Do When Things Get Messy and Uncomfortable
MARY JO BARRETT & LINDA STONE FISH

MARY JO BARRETT & LINDA STONE FISH

When working with trauma cases do you often see clients go into flight, fight, and/or freeze? Do they yell at you, insult you, or leave the session? Are there times you find yourself angry at your clients or just downright don’t like them? Do you recognize your own flight, fight, and/or freeze response? Welcome to the messy, often confusing world of trauma treatment. In this workshop, you’ll explore practical in-session techniques as well as a framework to help you recognize what’s happening when things heat up and get intense.

  • Focus on how to assess the client’s motivation, stage of change, and preferred mode of learning and how to build a therapeutic collaboration around it
  • Explore the importance of therapist transparency and how to empower clients by making the therapy process as safe and explicit as possible
  • Learn how to explore intra-family violence or include additional family members in your sessions

Continued with workshop 313.

Mary Jo Barrett, MSW, Executive Director and Founder, The Center for Contextual Change.  Creator of The Collaborative Change Model; A Meta Model for the Treatment of Complex Trauma.  Co-author of Treating Complex Trauma: A Relational Blueprint for Collaboration and Change.

Linda Stone Fish, MSW, PhD, the David B. Falk Endowed Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy at Syracuse University, is the author of Nurturing Queer Youth.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

215 – Moving Through the Eye of the Storm (Clinical Showcase*)

Maintaining Safety and Stability in Trauma Therapy
RICHARD SCHWARTZ, DEANY LALIOTIS & JANINA FISHER

Whatever their approach, most trauma therapists would agree that establishing a sense of safety and connection is essential to therapeutic success. But different models offer very different methods for creating those conditions. Using videos of actual sessions, this Clinical Showcase session will examine the contrasting ways that Internal Family Systems (IFS) and Eye Movement and Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) approach this fundamental clinical task. Among the topics covered will be how to:

  • Rise to the challenge of negotiating with different parts of self that can be activated by trauma
  • Maintain an attuned connection with the client, while at the same time, facilitating the client’s access to their inner experience
  • Enhance your ability to respond effectively to clients’ moment-to-moment experience, especially during extreme states of distress, that may trigger you

Richard Schwartz, PhD, is director of the Center for Self Leadership and the originator of the Internal Family Systems Model. He’s also the author of Internal Family Systems Therapy.

Deany Laliotis, LICSW, is a trainer, clinical consultant, and practitioner of EMDR. She’s on the faculty of EMDR Institute, Inc., and is the codirector of EMDR of Greater Washington.

Janina Fisher, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and instructor at the Trauma Center in Boston, a senior faculty member of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, and a former instructor at Harvard Medical School.

* Clinical Showcases highlight the different ways well-known innovators approach common clinical problems. Master therapists will show video clips of their work and then engage in a probing exploration of their moment-to-moment therapeutic decision-making. The goal is to open up possibilities for dialogue, debate, and fresh perspectives not usually featured within more standard workshop formats.

 

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

217 – Mastering the Anxiety Game

Teaching Clients to Welcome their Fears
REID WILSON

Therapists are supposed to make clients safe and secure, creating a cozy haven from a cruel world, right? Well, when it comes to treating anxiety, there’s growing evidence that the quickest, most effective approach involves instructing them to ramp up their fears while telling themselves how much they welcome the experience. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to help clients shift their relationship with their fears and override the responses that perpetuate them. You’ll explore:

  • How to rapidly engage anxious clients in the therapeutic alliance and change their mindset toward their fears
  • Why the first step to changing an overwhelming response to anxiety is accepting the perceived threat as something the client can approach and change
  • Strategies to help clients transform their fear into a challenge to be met or a puzzle to be solved

Reid Wilson, PhD, is adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at the UNC School of Medicine and the author of Don’t Panic and Stopping the Noise in Your Head and coauthor of Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents as well as Playing with Anxiety and Stop Obsessing! 

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Uncategorized, workshops | Tagged , , ,

220 – Don’t Ask Me to Forgive You!

A Radical Approach to Healing Interpersonal Wounds
JANIS ABRAHMS SPRING

Forgiveness has been held up as the gold standard of recovery from interpersonal injuries, but in real life, hurt parties often find that they can’t or won’t forgive, particularly when the offender is unrepentant or dead. In this workshop, you’ll learn to reframe the issue in ruptured relationships not as forgiveness, but as acceptance without forgiving. We’ll explore how to:

  • Differentiate between forgiveness as it’s traditionally defined and acceptance as a tool to free clients from bitterness or preoccupation with their wounds
  • Coach hurt parties to reframe the personal meaning of a deeply wounding experience without the additional dimension of shame
  • Design ways to create an apology that’s specific and heartfelt
  • Empower both parties to acknowledge a fair share of responsibility for the wound as a way of fostering personal growth and perhaps reconnection and forgiveness

Janis Abrahms Spring, PhD, ABPP, is a former clinical supervisor at Yale University and author of After the Affair, How Can I Forgive You? and Life with Pop.

Posted in Couples, Kids, and Families, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , ,

225 – The New World of Clinical Virtual Reality

A Visit to the Future of Therapy Practice
SKIP RIZZO

Since the 1990s, virtual reality (VR) has rapidly evolved from an expensive computer toy into an affordable, increasingly popular clinical tool for assessing, managing, and treating such conditions as anxiety disorders, PTSD, acute pain, autism spectrum disorder, and ADHD. In this comprehensive overview of the therapeutic applications of VR, you’ll see a hands-on demo if the PTSD treatment system and also learn how to:

  • Enhance exposure therapy with anxiety disorders and PTSD through immersing clients in simulated experiences
  • Add a new treatment dimension to cognitive and motor rehabilitation, as well as pain distraction
  • Use VR for highly interactive clinical training and as an online healthcare support
  • Advance the clinical research and practice by leveraging the immersive and interactive companenets of the technology in such a fashion as to be considered “the ultimate Skinner box.”

Albert “Skip” Rizzo, PhD, is a psychologist and research professor at USC Davis School of Gerontology and USC Keck School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences. He directs the Medical VR Lab at the USC Institute for Creative Technolgies where he researches the design, development, and evaluation of VR systems targeting the areas of clinical assessment/treatment, rehabilitation, and resilience.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , ,

228 – Addressing Attachment Issues with Traumatized Teens

Getting Hooked—and Unhooked
MARTHA STRAUS

To work with troubled and traumatized adolescents, it’s crucial for therapists to first foster their own capacity for self-awareness and self-regulation. It’s not easy, though, especially when our young clients’ extreme reactions—ranging from angry arousal to frozen shutting down—can trigger our own sense of helplessness, failure, dissociation, and rejection. In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to use this nonfunctional cycle to get unhooked by:

  • Identifying specific adolescent attachment styles that interact with or trigger our own
  • Exploring the React, Reflect, and Respond model to best help our clients
  • Using The Four M’s—mirroring, mentalizing, mindfulness, and modulation—to increase connection and mood regulation
  • Focusing on attunement—including strategies of validation, self-disclosure, and the compassionate sharing of adult feelings and opinions—to bring traumatized teens back into relationship with themselves and you

Martha Straus, PhD, a professor in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Antioch University New England, is the author of No-Talk Therapy for Children and Adolescents and Adolescent Girls in Crisis: Intervention and Hope, and the forthcoming Developmental-Relational Interventions with Traumatized Teens: The Challenge of Attachment.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Couples, Kids, and Families, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

402/502 – Unremitting Anxiety

Finding Effective Treatments for Intractable Symptoms
MARGARET WEHRENBERG

How often have you used tried-and-true anxiety management skills only to find your clients’ panic still haunts them and their worry is unremitting? The obstacles to a more successful outcome may lie in failing to recognize undiagnosed co-occurring conditions. In this session, we’ll look at what to do when your anxious clients seem unable to recover. Together, we’ll explore:

  • Why refusing reassurance is the wrong move for worried clients with Asperger’s but the right move for OCD clients to eliminate excessive worry
  • The role of sensory sensitivity in remitting anxiety as it shows up in bipolar II, undiagnosed autism spectrum disorder, and ADHD
  • How to use journaling to identify and eliminate anxiety triggers and to determine when it’s easier to be anxious than angry
  • How to separate the client’s authentic voice from the OCD voice to treat extreme worry

Continued with workshop 502.

Margaret Wehrenberg, PsyD, is a practicing clinical psychologist, international speaker, and author of The 10 Best Anxiety Busters and The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., Saturday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , ,