Rick Hanson

601 – Hardwiring Happiness

From Passing States to Lasting Traits
RICK HANSON

We all need inner strengths such as resilience, confidence, and feeling cared about to bolster us through life—strengths largely derived from our positive experiences of them. Unfortunately, the brain’s evolved negativity bias, which makes it like Velcro for the bad and Teflon for the good, creates a kind of bottleneck that blocks the conversion of positive mental states into positive neural traits. Unless it’s addressed, this bottleneck limits the benefits of our efforts to heal and grow, including through psychotherapy. This workshop will explore lessons from the neuropsychology of emotional learning for:

  • Overcoming the negativity bias
  • Promoting key positive experiences that meet our core needs for safety, satisfaction, and connection
  • Enriching and absorbing these experiences to install them in neural structure

Rick Hanson, PhD, is a neuropsychologist and New York Times bestselling author. A Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, he’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide.

Posted in Mind, Body, and Brain, Sunday: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., workshops | Tagged , ,

9:00 AM Sunday Keynote

How Hard Times Can Open the Heart: Deepening Your Brain’s Natural Powers for Healing
Rick Hanson

With his bestselling books Buddha’s Brain, Hardwiring Happiness, and Just One Thing, psychologist Rick Hanson has become the foremost explicator of the brain’s “negativity bias,” our evolutionary tendency as vulnerable mammals to be more or less continually on the lookout for danger, ready to fight or flee, and more likely to remember bad experiences than good. Integrating his background in neuroscience, contemplative practices, and
positive psychology, he’s also become one of our foremost clinical innovators, focused on how to help clients have greater access to their inner resources and enhance their capacity for deep pleasure and savoring the moment.

In his keynote address, Rick will focus on how our deepening understanding of neuroscience can enable us, even in times of great stress, to tap into five natural capacities of the brain that, rather than constricting us into fight, flight or freeze, can open possibilities for living fuller, more aware lives.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Mind, Body, and Brain, Sunday Highlights | Tagged ,