Personal and Professional Development

410/510 – Working with the “Difficult” Male Client

Wexler, David 2016
How to Get Beyond Shame-o-phobia
DAVID WEXLER

Therapists often fail to create a user-friendly environment for reluctant male clients. The problem begins with a lack of awareness about how men fear having their shame and vulnerability exposed. This workshop will teach you about the mismatch between men’s relational style and the touchy-feely atmosphere of most counseling, and how to engage even “difficult” or “defensive” men and move them to the next level of intimacy and authenticity. You’ll learn to:

  • Recognize the defenses and perception of shame that keep men from confronting their emotions
  • Develop enhanced skills in building a therapeutic relationship with men based on straightforward guidance and “guy talk,” rather than ambiguous therapy-speak
  • Use specific techniques to counteract male relational dread and coach men to communicate in a related way
  • Help a man’s partner learn how to bring out his best qualities, without becoming codependent

Continued with workshop 510.

David Wexler, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and the executive director of the Relationship Training Institute. He’s the author of six books, including Men in Therapy and When Good Men Behave Badly.

Posted in All Day, Couples, Kids, and Families, Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., Saturday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Uncategorized, workshops | Tagged , ,

411/511 – A New Model for Private Practice

Gordon,-James-2013
A Mind-Body Approach
JAMES GORDON

Increasingly, therapists are looking for alternatives to the timeworn, office-bound rigidity of traditional private practice. This workshop offers a new vision of the private practice format: inclusion of an educational group process that can be used in a wide variety of settings with many different populations—people suffering from common problem like depression, anxiety, chronic illness, and trauma, as well as other healthcare professionals and community leaders. You’ll learn how to:

  • Teach members self-awareness and self-care through guided meditation, drawing, journaling, movement, and other mind–body skills.
  • Transition from the usual therapist role to one of group leader, educator, guide, and coach
  • Develop a business model for both expanding your practice and reaching large numbers of people you might not otherwise serve

Continued with workshop 511.

James Gordon, MD, a psychiatrist, is the founder and executive director of the Center for Mind–Body Medicine and clinical professor in the departments of psychiatry and family medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine. He’s the author of Unstuck: Your Guide to the Seven-Stage Journey out of Depression. His group work with war-traumatized Gazan and Israeli children was featured on 60 Minutes.

Posted in All Day, Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., Saturday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , ,

412/512 – Mistakes of the Heart

Fisher, Janina 2016 2
Turning Miscues into Learning Opportunities
JANINA FISHER

Therapists are human; therefore, we all inevitably make mistakes. Unfortunately, we don’t always have the opportunity to safely acknowledge, process, and grow from them, much less help our clients recover from the hurt and anger we’ve inadvertently caused. This workshop will examine the underlying issues that often contribute to common therapist errors, explore how “mistakes of the heart” occur and can be acknowledged, and discover ways to “repair” relational ruptures so they become healing opportunities. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to:

  • Recognize the bodily signs of our countertransference responses, decreasing the possibility of “foot in mouth” comments, shutting down, or empathic failure
  • Identify the clients and issues most likely to trigger our fear and frustration and experiment with how to regulate our internal experience
  • Rehearse how to counteract triggers and repair ruptures in therapeutic connection
  • Practice using somatic communication to convey regret, re-attunement, and comfort rather than relying on words

Continued with workshop 512.

Janina Fisher, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and instructor at the Trauma Center in Boston, a senior faculty member of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, and a former instructor at Harvard Medical School.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., Saturday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , ,

413/513 – An Introduction to Brainspotting

grand.david
Processing Trauma without Talking About It
DAVID GRAND

Symptoms of unprocessed trauma—including dissociation, numbing, and chronic anxiety—are notoriously difficult to eliminate through talk therapy. The reason: the overwhelmed brain is unable to process verbal information about the events. But Brainspotting, a brain-based method for clearing trauma blockage without clients having to talk about it, nurtures the capacity for natural self-healing. Through demonstrations and participation, you’ll explore how to:

  • Identify specific eye movements, including wobbles and microsaccades, as well as other facial cues and reflexes that reveal specific “spots” in the brain associated with the activation of trauma
  • Guide traumatized clients to attend to their inner experience as they move through dissociative blocks and maximize a process of self-healing
  • Develop skills that allow you to pay attention to your interactions with clients while also staying attuned to the internal brain changes reflected in their eye movements

Continued with workshop 513.

David Grand, PhD, is the developer of Brainspotting and has trained more than 8,000 therapists internationally. He’s the author of Brainspotting: The Revolutionary New Therapy for Rapid and Effective Change.

Posted in All Day, Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., Saturday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , ,

417 – How to Uplift Your Clients

Armstrong, Courtney 2016
The Secrets of Sparking “Aha” Moments
COURTNEY ARMSTRONG

Here’s the dilemma: you want to validate your clients’ emotions, but you also know that spending too much time focusing on pain can lead to therapeutic stagnation. The solution: uplift your clients to evoke their desired emotional state. Eliciting these positive emotions will give them access to inner resources for more active and productive problem solving. While avoiding mutual burnout from sessions that go nowhere. You’ll learn how to:

  • Frame ideas, questions, and other interventions to boost motivation and foster hope
  • Use music and movement to lift depression, calm anxiety, and empower traumatized clients
  • Use imagery techniques to elicit desired emotions and spark “Aha” moments

Courtney Armstrong, LPC, trains professionals in creative therapy techniques and is the author of The Therapeutic “Aha!”: Ten Strategies for Getting Clients Unstuck and Transforming Traumatic Grief.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., workshops | Tagged , , ,

419 – From Patients to Consumers

Grodzki, Lynn 2016
Engaging Clients in the New Psychotherapy Marketplace
LYNN GRODZKI

In today’s marketplace, therapists who want their practices to thrive need to change the way they present themselves to clients who want it all—a price bargain and immediate results. So how do we explain to these anxious “shoppers” that lasting change takes time? This workshop provides comprehensive coaching in how to adjust your mindset to align with the expectations of today’s clients. You’ll learn how to:

  • Identify techniques that engage potential clients from the first phone call, using jargon-free language to describe the benefits of therapy and what you can offer them
  • Practice strategies for comfortably responding to up-front questions about the duration of treatment, fees, and insurance
  • Demystify therapy and show tangible benefits by giving the client a take-home message at the conclusion of each session
  • Retain clients longer by using metaphors about treatment the average person can understand

Note: This workshop doesn’t qualify for continuing education for psychologists.

Lynn Grodzki, LCSW, MCC, a psychotherapist and master certified coach, is the author of Building Your Ideal Private Practice: 2nd Edition and works as a business coach with therapists internationally, showing them how to improve their practices.

Posted in Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., workshops | Tagged , ,

424 – Sex Made Simple

mccarthy.barry2015
Reigniting the Spark in Intimate Relationships
BARRY MCCARTHY

Sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction is the most common mental health problem in the United States. But all too often when clients raise sexual problems in therapy, clinicians either skirt the issue by diverting the conversation to other personal and relational issues or reinforce the myth that a stand-alone medical intervention will cure them. This workshop will teach you to deal directly with your clients’ sexual issues, especially how to rekindle desire and help couples be intimate and erotic friends, whether they’re 27 or 77, straight or gay, married or not. You’ll explore how to:

  • Challenge “sexual poisons” such as the beliefs that all sex should be intimate and mutual and that using erotic fantasy during sex is a betrayal
  • Help couples embrace a Good-Enough Sex approach encompassing multiple roles, meanings, and outcomes
  • Explore with couples the different types, strengths, and drawbacks of a range of common sexual styles

Barry McCarthy, PhD, a professor of psychology at American University, is the author of Sex Made Simple, Therapy with Men After Sixty; Rekindling Desire; Discovering Your Couple Sexual Style; Enduring Desire: Your Guide to Lifelong Intimacy; and Sexual Awareness.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Couples, Kids, and Families, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., workshops | Tagged , , ,

425 – Improving School Performance

Nelson, Jody 2016
How to Enhance Therapist–Teacher Collaboration
JODY NELSON

Just as family and home environments can create and maintain mental health disorders, teachers and school environments can contribute to the various performance problems young people experience. This workshop targets two practitioner audiences—therapists already working in school-based or school-linked setting and office-based clinicians interested in collaborating more effectively with teachers and schools. In this workshop, you’ll learn several powerful techniques, including:

  • Treatment planning system approaches with common school problem such as noncompliance, attention difficulties, peer relationship struggles, emotional dysregulation, avoidance, and defiance
  • Processes and protocols to improve collaboration with schools and teachers, including drafts of MOUs, contract templates, student support team designs, and case coordination guidelines
  • Specific techniques teachers can use in the school setting to reinforce treatment goals, including strategies to work with resistance, provide choices, be a relationship coach, and create calm in the learning environment

Jody Nelson, EdD, LMFT, is chair of the Master of Arts in Mariage and Family Program, Argosy University/Twin Cities and associate director of Guadalupe Alternative Programs, a community-based organization.

Posted in Couples, Kids, and Families, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., workshops | Tagged , , , ,

426 – Overcoming Culture Blindness

Mandley_Anita 2016
Treating Cultural and Historical Traumas
ANITA MANDLEY

If you work with African Americans, Native Americans, Holocaust survivors and their descendants, or any other disenfranchised clients, you’re working with the legacies of cultural and historical trauma. This workshop will open a path toward addressing wounds and issues that too often go ignored and limit the effectiveness of therapy. Discover how to enhance your work with people who have different cultural, religious, and racial backgrounds as well as those from a different gender or social class. We’ll focus on:

  • Increasing awareness of how race, culture, identity, social context, and privilege shape the development of complex trauma and impact the therapeutic relationship
  • Learning a model of self-regulation that allows therapists to regulate their neurobiological activation and bias
  • Using cultural assessment to understand the intersection of culture, race, and identity with developmental and complex trauma
  • Identifying and addressing the survival narrative that can be the key to working with clients’ cultural trauma

Note: This workshop fulfills many state-board requirements for training in cultural competency.
Anita Mandley, MS, LCPC, serves as the team leader for the Adult Trauma Team and the Dialectical Behavior Team at the Center for Contextual Change.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M., workshops | Tagged , , , ,

515 – Engaging the Client with a Disorganized Attachment Style (Clinical Showcase*)

Fosha, Diana 2016
Avoiding the Common Pitfalls
DIANA FOSHA, DIANE POOLE HELLER & STEPHEN PORGES

Straightforward problem-solving is simply not an effective option in work with clients with intense trauma histories and disorganized attachment styles. Therapeutic tasks like creating initial conditions of safety, determining optimal therapeutic proximity, effectively using the “relational field,” and resourcing interventions are central to success with such clients. This special workshop will focus on the challenges of doing attachment-based work with an extremely vulnerable treatment population by bringing together two noted therapists and a neuroscientist to discuss videos of actual clinical cases. Among the topics we’ll look at are:

  • The dangers of retraumatization and determining the appropriate intensity level a client can tolerate
  • Disentangling the threat response needed to defend against a scary parent from the healthy orientation toward connection of secure attachment
  • How the Polyvagal Theory can illuminate both the nature of disorganized attachment and the process of therapeutic healing

Diana Fosha, PhD, is the developer of Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) and founder and director of the AEDP Institute. She’s the author of The Transforming Power of Affect and coeditor of The Healing Power of Emotion: Affective Neuroscience, Development & Clinical Practice.

Diane Poole Heller, PhD, is the creator of the Dynamic Attachment Re-Patterning Experience (DARe), Somatic Attachment Training (SATe) certification program, Therapy Mastermind Circle, Attachment Mastery online courses, and Psychotherapy 2.0 Summit with Sounds True.

Stephen Porges, PhD, is Distinguished University Scientist at Indiana University, where he’s creating a trauma research center within the Kinsey Institute. He’s author of The Polyvagal Theory.

* Clinical Showcases highlight the different ways well-known innovators approach common clinical problems. Master therapists will show video clips of their work and then engage in a probing exploration of their moment-to-moment therapeutic decision-making. The goal is to open up possibilities for dialogue, debate, and fresh perspectives not usually featured within more standard workshop formats.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Afternoon: 3 P.M. – 5 P.M., workshops | Tagged , , , , , ,

519 – Grounding the Overwhelmed Client

Cornell, Ann Weiser 2016
Client-Empowering Skills for Emotional Regulation
ANN WEISER CORNELL

For the work of therapy to move forward, clients need some emotional regulation from the start. This workshop will offer interventions that help clients acknowledge, be with, and keep company with even their most intensely vulnerable states. We’ll explore how to help clients develop a more compassionate inner relationship with distressing thoughts and feelings. You’ll learn how to:

  • Use language and techniques that support clients in being with extreme emotions instead of being flooded by them
  • Give your clients “homework” in the form of emotional regulation practices to use in between sessions
  • Strengthen your own calm presence with your clients even when you’re tired or feeling emotionally triggered

Ann Weiser Cornell, PhD, is a Focusing teacher and facilitator who’s been training clinicians in Focusing for more than 30 years. She’s the author of Focusing in Clinical Practice: The Essence of Change.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Afternoon: 3 P.M. – 5 P.M., workshops | Tagged , ,

520 – Sticky Minds and Subtle OCD

Winston, Sally 2016
How to Stop Co-Compulsing with Your Clients
SALLY WINSTON & MARTIN SEIF

We’ve all had the experience of working with clients who get stuck as they talk in endless loops about their worries or preoccupations, continually returning to the distressed place they started. That’s because what’s really troubling the client is a subtle form of OCD that requires a different type of approach. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to identify and treat OCD masquerading as other issues by exploring:

  • How therapy-as-usual, such as teaching coping skills or rational self-talk, can reinforce the subtle OCD symptoms
  • How to shift the focus from how OCD symptoms originated or what they mean to the cognitive compulsions that maintain them
  • How to implement effective therapy in which the goal is to change the
    client’s relationship with his or her thoughts, not the thoughts themselves

Sally Winston, PsyD, cofounded and codirects the Anxiety and Stress Disorders Institute of Maryland. She’s the recipient of the Jerilyn Ross Award of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and coauthor of What Every Therapist Needs to Know about Anxiety Disorders.
Martin Seif, PhD, ABPP, cofounded the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. He’s associate director of the Anxiety and Phobia Treatment Center at White Plains Hospital and coauthor of What Every Therapist Needs to Know about Anxiety Disorders.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Personal and Professional Development, Saturday Afternoon: 3 P.M. – 5 P.M., workshops | Tagged , , ,