Personal and Professional Development

122 – From Good to Great

78886-100401-04
The Pathway to Therapeutic Excellence
HEDY SCHLEIFER

Are you searching for a way to move to the next level of clinical expertise and enjoyment in your work? In this workshop, take part in an experiential learning adventure in how to go from “good to great.” You’ll leave with renewed energy and inspired ideas on how to become the therapist you envision yourself to be. You’ll also discover:

  • The research-based principles for growth developed by Jim Collins in his bestselling classic Good to Great
  • The fundamental principles at the heart of professional competence and best practices for pursuing them
  • Your core goals, values, passions, and ways to maintain your focus in the face of obstacles and challenges
  • How to confront difficulties and disappointments and use them as a launching pad for increased confidence

Hedy Schleifer, MA, LMHC, an internationally known couples therapist and clinical trainer, is the founder of the Tikkun Learning Center and the originator of Encounter-centered Couples Therapy (EcCT).

Posted in Personal and Professional Development, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical: 9:30 A.M. – NOON & 1 P.M. – 4 P.M., Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , ,

123 – Expanding Your Sexual Comfort Zone

Nelson, Tammy 2016
Getting Beyond Myths and Stereotypes
TAMMY NELSON

Working with sexual issues in therapy and the often edgy erotic behavior people engage in can challenges a therapist’s own values and deeply held beliefs about sex and relationships. As an introduction to sex therapy, this workshop will include videos, live demonstrations, and small-group discussion around sexual practice, providing essential training to help therapists face their own preconceived notions and countertransference issues around eroticism and intimacy. In this workshop, you’ll:

• Work through your own sex-related stereotypes, resistance, guilt, and shame to create a safe, comfortable, and nonjudgmental environment for clients
• Learn about alternative sexual practices, open monogamy, fetishes, BDSM, paraphilias, cross-dressing, and a range of other behaviors
• Process responses and any vicarious trauma that may be triggered by issues around pornography, sexual exploitation, and other erotic practices
• Expand your ability to communicate about sexual issues in the consulting room

Tammy Nelson, PhD, is a board-certified sexologist, certified Imago therapist, licensed professional counselor, and author of Getting the Sex You Want and The New Monogamy.

Posted in Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Couples, Kids, and Families, Personal and Professional Development, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical: 9:30 A.M. – NOON & 1 P.M. – 4 P.M., Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , ,

126 – A Day for New Therapists

Grodzki, Lynn 2016
Learning the Principles of Successful Practice
LYNN GRODZKI

New therapists can be overwhelmed by the sheer number of existing approaches and the litany of do’s and don’ts they’ve been taught. This workshop will offer basic principles that transcend modalities and present practical advice about a range of difficult therapy situations. You’ll sharpen your professional skills and expand your tool box as you explore:

  • How to organize the essential information about a case and formulate an initial framing of goals for the client
  • Ways to use your “self” in therapy
  • The importance of tracking progress with the client, methods for measuring that progress, and what to do when there’s little or no progress
  • How to build and operate an effective practice

Lynn Grodzki, LCSW, MCC, a psychotherapist and master certified coach, is the author of Building Your Ideal Private Practice: 2nd Edition and works as a business coach with therapists internationally, showing them how to improve their practices.

Posted in Personal and Professional Development, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical: 9:30 A.M. – NOON & 1 P.M. – 4 P.M., Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , ,

127 – The Ethical Dilemmas No One Talks About

Barrett, Mary Jo 2016
Clarifying Boundaries in 21st-Century Practice
MARY JO BARRETT & LINDA STONE FISH

The ethical rules for therapists used to be straightforward and unambiguous: no gifts, no dual relationships, no out-of-session contact, and of course, no sex. But the ease of digital connection and the shift in our profession’s norms have introduced new questions about professional boundaries many of us are unprepared for. How exactly do we manage relationships through email, texting, Facebook, and social media? Should we Google clients before our first session? How do we deal with rating sites like Healthgrades? In this workshop, we’ll explore ethical dilemmas, old and new, including:

  • How to set the ground rules for therapy that establish norms for transparency and client empowerment from the very first contact
  • The do’s and don’ts of therapist self-disclosure and participating in client celebrations and ritual occasions
  • How to maintain our energy to ensure we make wise ethical decisions

Note: This workshop fulfills many state-board requirements for training in ethics and risk management.

Mary Jo Barrett, MSW, Executive Director and Founder, The Center for Contextual Change.  Creator of The Collaborative Change Model; A Meta Model for the Treatment of Complex Trauma.  Co-author of Treating Complex Trauma: A Relational Blueprint for Collaboration and Change.

Linda Stone Fish, MSW, PhD, the David B. Falk Endowed Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy at Syracuse University, is the author of Nurturing Queer Youth.

Posted in Personal and Professional Development, Thursday Pre-Conference Clinical: 9:30 A.M. – NOON & 1 P.M. – 4 P.M., Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - Noon & 1 p.m. - 4 p.m., workshops | Tagged , , , ,

202/302 – Engaging Men in Attachment-Focused Therapy

Fosha, Diana 2016
Exploring the Neurobiology of Sex Differences
DIANA FOSHA

Far fewer men than women are making use of psychotherapy, even though the rate of serious problems among men—such as alcoholism, ADHD, and suicidality—are far higher. One reason is that basic therapeutic practices are more congruent with women’s ways of engaging than with men’s. Making use of clinical videotapes, this workshop will show you how to work with men’s attachment trauma and intense emotions, and simultaneously undo the shame men often feel about being in therapy. You’ll discover how to:

  • Use gender-specific, attachment-based interventions to engage men more fully in the therapeutic process
  • Incorporate the practice of dyadic mindfulness to consolidate therapeutic gains, foster resilience, and deepen the experience of feeling seen, felt, and understood
  • Apply meta-therapeutic processing to help men explore their experience in the moment, especially when positive change occurs, in ways that can feel empowering

Continued with workshop 302.

Diana Fosha, PhD, is the developer of Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) and founder and director of the AEDP Institute. She’s the author of The Transforming Power of Affect and coeditor of The Healing Power of Emotion: Affective Neuroscience, Development & Clinical Practice, as well as many papers on healing transformational processes in experiential therapy and trauma treatment.

Posted in All Day, Couples, Kids, and Families, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , ,

203/303 – The Healing Power of Self-Compassion

Desmond, Tim 2016
Advanced Clinical Tools and Cutting-Edge Science
TIM DESMOND

From depression and anxiety to addiction and trauma, a lack of self-compassion is at the core of nearly every presenting problem. Luckily, neuroscience has demonstrated that through practice, self-compassion is a skill that can regulate emotions, transform negative core beliefs, and heal trauma. This highly interactive workshop brings together recent discoveries in neurobiology, cognitive science, and psychotherapy outcome research to give you a wealth of information about new developments that have huge implications for therapy, including:

  • Learning how the brain’s compassion center, which neuroscientists call the Care circuit, can be targeted and fortified using specific techniques
  • Self-compassion practices that have been adopted specifically for different kinds of presenting problems, including trauma, depression, and anxiety
  • How you can use self-compassion practices to enhance your relationships with clients and make your work more enjoyable and deeply fulfilling

Continued with workshop 303.

Tim Desmond, LMFT, is a psychotherapist, student of Thich Nhat Hanh, and cofounder of the Morning Sun Mindfulness Center in New Hampshire who trains therapists in mindfulness and self-compassion practices. He is also the author of Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy.

Posted in All Day, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Mind, Body, and Brain, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

208/308 – Lessons of Loss

Neimeyer, Robert 2016
A New Approach to Grief Work
ROBERT NEIMEYER

Death doesn’t end a relationship. In this workshop, we’ll explore a new way of doing grief work that helps the bereaved person say goodbye to one aspect of the relationship with a departed loved one while learning to acknowledge a continuing bond and a different kind of ongoing connection. We’ll learn a variety of ways to help clients face the challenge of grief by discovering how to:

  • Identify factors that complicate the experience of grief, such as insecure attachments and invisible/divided loyalties
  • Use meaning-making strategies such as restorative retellings of the death and reviewing the life imprint of the deceased on the client’s own life
  • Introduce imagined dialogues with the loved one to reaffirm love and resolve residual grief

Continued with workshop 308.

Robert Neimeyer, PhD, has published 28 books, including Techniques of Grief Therapy. He’s a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Memphis and maintains an active clinical practice. He served as president of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, and as chair of the International Work Group for Death, Dying, & Bereavement.

Posted in All Day, Anxiety, Depression and Trauma, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , , , ,

212/312 – Mastering the Art of Empathic Confrontation

Behary, Wendy 2016 3
Beyond the Niceness Trap
WENDY BEHARY

Do you “play nice” and shy away from confrontation with evasive, oppressive, prickly, pompous, or narcissistic clients—even when you know that challenging them and setting limits is precisely what you should do? Then this is the workshop for you. You’ll learn specific strategies to address the discomfort, fears, and desire to be liked that can get in the way of your meeting the challenges such clients pose. Discover how to:

  • Say “no” with your face and body language, as you learn how not to look, act, or feel like a doormat
  • Use empathic confrontation to reengage with clients while also setting limits and holding them accountable
  • Identify and explore your own triggers to enhance your ability to differentiate between protecting clients and holding back from expressing truths that may be painful but necessary

Continued with workshop 312.

Wendy Behary, LCSW, is the founder and director of The Cognitive Therapy Center of New Jersey and The New Jersey Institute for Schema Therapy. She’s the author of Disarming the Narcissist and Let’s Face It!

Posted in All Day, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Friday: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. – 5 p.m., Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , ,

218 – Playing to the Edge

Armstrong, Courtney 2016
Stretching Clients beyond Their Comfort Zones
COURTNEY ARMSTRONG

Good therapy often involves moving beyond providing acceptance and safety to challenging clients to stretch beyond their comfort zones and try things they didn’t think they were capable of. But how do you effectively challenge clients without overwhelming them or running them off? In this workshop, you’ll learn the art of “playing to the edge,” a term used in yoga that means stretching just beyond your comfort zone without causing unnecessary or counterproductive pain. Discover how to expand your clients’ expressive and behavioral range by:

  • Reframing a challenge into a compelling invitation using imagery and the powerful Align, Lift, and Lead communication strategy
  • Co-creating goals that are emotionally intriguing enough to motivate clients to push past their fears and explore new experiences
  • Playfully provoking your clients with fun experiments that make it enjoyable for them to try new skills

Courtney Armstrong, LPC, trains mental health professionals in creative techniques for healing trauma and is the author of The Therapeutic “Aha!”: 10 Strategies for Getting Your Clients Unstuck and Transforming Traumatic Grief.

Posted in Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , , , ,

220 – Don’t Ask Me to Forgive You!

Spring, Janis Abrahms 2016
A Radical Approach to Healing Interpersonal Wounds
JANIS ABRAHMS SPRING

Forgiveness has been held up as the gold standard of recovery from interpersonal injuries, but in real life, hurt parties often find that they can’t or won’t forgive, particularly when the offender is unrepentant or dead. In this workshop, you’ll learn to reframe the issue in ruptured relationships not as forgiveness, but as acceptance without forgiving. We’ll explore how to:

  • Differentiate between forgiveness as it’s traditionally defined and acceptance as a tool to free clients from bitterness or preoccupation with their wounds
  • Coach hurt parties to reframe the personal meaning of a deeply wounding experience without the additional dimension of shame
  • Design ways to create an apology that’s specific and heartfelt
  • Empower both parties to acknowledge a fair share of responsibility for the wound as a way of fostering personal growth and perhaps reconnection and forgiveness

Janis Abrahms Spring, PhD, ABPP, is a former clinical supervisor at Yale University and author of After the Affair, How Can I Forgive You? and Life with Pop.

Posted in Couples, Kids, and Families, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , ,

221 – Men and Integrity

Dougherty, Patrick 2016
Exploring a New Way to Engage Your Male Clients
PATRICK DOUGHERTY

Therapists often struggle to find leverage in working with defensive or avoidant male clients reluctant to engage emotionally with their partners or in the therapy room. But while they resist deeper psychological inquiry, evoking the masculine virtue of integrity can help men develop a new vision of who they wish to be. Then from this place of integrity, they can become more focused on taking responsibility for their own behavior and why they act and react the way they do. We’ll explore how to:

  • Help men internalize and organize behavior around the five attributes of integrity: honesty, vulnerability, guilt/remorse, listening, and direct expression of feelings
  • Learn techniques to get men to embrace their vulnerability and acknowledge difficult-to-address issues, such as sexual intimidation, threatening behavior or passive withdrawal
  • Practice drawing up specific action plans for men that will lead to their making amends to their partner while also restoring their own sense of dignity and integrity

Patrick Dougherty, MA, LP, a psychologist in private practice for more than 35 years and has been focusing on men’s issues for over three decades. He’s the author of Qigong in Psychotherapy: You Can Do So Much by Doing So Little and A Whole-Hearted Embrace: Finding Love at the Center of It All.

Posted in Couples, Kids, and Families, Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , ,

224 – When the Therapist Gets Triggered

capturewer3
The View from Two Different Career Stages
JETTE SIMON & SIGNE SIMON-COULTER

As therapists, we all know moments when the intensity of the emotions our clients trigger in us can be disorienting or even overwhelming. What’s not often discussed is how those trigger moments can vary as a function of the therapist’s age and experience. In this workshop, two therapists—one early in her career and the other in practice for over 35 years—will explore the difficult emotions that can arise in response to different clients and how to respond to them. We’ll explore:

  • The differences and similarities in what’s likely to trigger therapists
    at different stages of their clinical
    development
  • How distinguishing primary and secondary emotions can be clinically helpful in getting beyond triggers and regaining perspective and flexibility
  • Specific questions that can be used as tools to help you clarify what’s going on in moments of overwhelm and what you can do about it

Jette Simon, Lic, is an ICEEFT and certified trainer, supervisor, and therapist. She’s the director of Washington DC Training Institute for Couples Therapy and the EFT Institute in Copenhagen.

Signe Simon-Coulter, MSEd, is a doctoral candidate at Fordham University.

Posted in Friday Morning: 11 A.M. – 1 P.M, Personal and Professional Development, workshops | Tagged , , ,